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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • in reply to: Time and Priorities #15821
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Rachel, I would agree that this can be a challenge in the upper grades as they get into some longer books. I typically have 1-2 “make-up/get ahead” days as needed during the fiction units. I do make it clear these won’t be given if students aren’t completing work due to not concentrating, but will be given if they’ve worked hard but the reading is long. On these days I have activities for students who are already done (Read Theory on the computer, vocabulary work-pictionary station is their favorite, fluency test with me, etc).

    in reply to: Assessment Review #15818
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Combining all these together will give us a very good idea of student achievement and growth.

    in reply to: Skill Development Assessment Practice #15816
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    I agree 🙂 The student clearly progressed as the unit went on. This is the goal for each student.

    in reply to: Reading assessment #15814
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    I agree that this section was a great reminder. I have a difficult time checking SPECS logs daily, but those are quick checks to make sure students are learning what they need to know for that skill.

    in reply to: SPECS #15699
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    It certainly makes you think about the skill at hand. I noticed my brain was thinking about cause and effect and then when I switched to Character it thought of a whole different side of the story.

    in reply to: Sample Plan #15683
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Alyssa, I agree that the multiple bullet points allow for a guided conversation that can take many directions. Students in 4th/5th typically enjoy CCS because they are given an opportunity to talk with one another about the book they are reading. The only time they sometimes don’t want group is if they have a longer book and are struggling to finish in the given time.

    in reply to: CCS #15680
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    I agree, the three work together so students can master the skill they are working on. Intellectual art brings out the creativity and allows students to process what they’ve learned in a different way.

    in reply to: Collaborative Comprehension #15671
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Jenni, as a 4th/5th grade teacher I am consistently amazed at the depth of the conversations around the reading table. I love hearing their ideas and enjoy hearing what they would advise the main character to do. Problem Solving has been my favorite unit recently because they take what they are learning in Bible class and apply it to help their character solve a problem or make a decision. I can understand how these conversations would be more difficult to have in the primary end as students use the majority of their attention to decode the words correctly.

    in reply to: Vocab. Demonstration #15662
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Barbara, I agree the introduction does help each student learn the word. My students love playing Pictionary or charades to review words!

    in reply to: Vocabulary #15657
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Jenni- there were several parts of introducing vocabulary that I previously have not been doing. I like the idea of illustrating the meaning rather than their sentences. Last year I had a student who made every sentence relate to space/shuttles/NASA. Trying to remember the pictures did not help her when she was thinking of the words because her sentences were all related to the same subject. The oral part of the introducing and pausing were also new to me. I look forward to using this new strategy as I think it will really help students to better understand each word!

    in reply to: Lesson Demonstration #15619
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Amy, I also thought his explanation was very clear. I liked how he thought out loud as he was making the visual tool so his students could know what his brain was doing to make the visual tool. I think I sometimes assume my students know what I’m thinking, but this was a really good demonstration of explaining the visual tool.

    in reply to: Visual Tools #15613
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Amy, I agree! I picked up on several events in the story that I would have otherwise glossed over. I know these visual tools are hard work for our kids, but it is so beneficial!

    in reply to: Current Instruction #15606
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Barbara, I agree that time is always an issue. I love the idea of using these skills in daily read alouds. I always do that during the modeling, but consistent modeling throughout the unit (not just when they are first learning it) would likely really help them cement those skills. Daily feedback is also my struggle, often due to time!

    in reply to: The Ride to London #15601
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Rachel, I agree. These questions could be answered by just skimming the text rather than really deeply comprehending it.

    in reply to: Reading Comprehension #15597
    Allison Scull
    Participant

    Sandy, I agree that students who have F&F as their reading curriculum have a deeper understanding of what they read. I have noticed in the past several years that the conversations we have in small groups are those of readers that really understand what is going on in the book as well as the deeper implications.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)