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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • in reply to: time and priorities #16190
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree that this is the heart of the unit. This is where students are really working with the text.

    in reply to: Assessments #16178
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    Yes, I agree these assessments can help me see what a student is missing, which can then help guide my teaching.

    in reply to: Reading Assessment and Feedback #16173
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree that assessment will have little benefit for students if they do not receive instructive feedback. Rather than just see that they got something wrong, it’s important for them to understand why they got something wrong.

    in reply to: SPECS Experience #16171
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I think those are valid questions. I also wonder about a single group having all my attention while other groups are “working.” I’m not sure you could spend much time with each group going over their findings while other groups are working/reading.

    in reply to: Sample plan #16166
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I also like the open ended questions that are included in the plan. It requires critical thinking skills and strong comprehension. Again, it goes beyond just finding a simple fact-based question that can be found in the text without actually reading the text.

    in reply to: CCS #16164
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree. A basic lecture, notes, and assessment will not stick with the students in the same way that these will. Students will remember what they discuss together, what they draw, etc. They are more likely to forget a 45 minute lecture.

    in reply to: Collaborative Comprehension #16162
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I think it is always a positive when students are able to engage in thoughtful, meaningful conversations about what they are reading. Like you said, they can learn from one another, which I think can be more impactful than when we as teachers tell them the same information.

    in reply to: Vocabulary Demonstration #16150
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I also like how it can be cross-curricular. It isn’t specific just to ELA.

    in reply to: Vocab Instruction #16148
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I don’t have any answers to your question because I am wondering the same thing. While this curriculum isn’t structured for a HS chemistry teacher, I still wonder if there is time to do this for a 7/8 grade English class. Obviously vocabulary is important, and elements of this can and should be incorporated in the classroom, but I’m not sure if time allows to do this for every vocabulary word every time.

    in reply to: Lesson Demonstration #16145
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree that this type of lesson requires the students truly read and understand the story rather than just look for basic facts about story.

    in reply to: The Night Book Visual Tool #16121
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree that it does help a student to differentiate between important events and just details. This can help students when they are trying to summarize a story.

    in reply to: Current Instruction #16109
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I think time for mastery is difficult to balance, especially when the students are at all different levels. One may master the concept in a day, while it may take another student a week. Furthermore, like you said, there’s always the next concept waiting to be taught. Covering all the required material is difficult; covering all the required material for mastery for every student can seem quite daunting.

    in reply to: The Ride to London #16107
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree. These questions are easy test questions to create, but they don’t really evaluate a student’s reading comprehension.

    in reply to: Definition of Reading Comprehension #16105
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree that reading comprehension is not simply a hunt for the right answer. To have a strong grasp of the text, understanding the author’s purpose will be very beneficial. I would think that would be helpful when reading scientific writings in which the author’s purpose may be to convince the reader of a certain hypothesis. If the reader understands that the purpose is to persuade rather than to inform, the reader may approach the material differently.

    in reply to: Reading Comprehension and Skill Mastery #15958
    Dee Edmondson
    Participant

    I agree that quality literature is an important aspect of helping students excel in reading. While students will differ in what they like and dislike, as educators we should examine the stories being taught and assess if they are of a high quality before assigning it to our students.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)