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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • in reply to: Time and Priorities #18598
    Keoni
    Participant

    Jenny,

    In the moment, I couldn’t actually think of any questions of my own. However, I second your question. This whole framework will look different in my classroom than it will in yours, but knowing how long to expect different grade level students to complete their assignments is helpful!

    -Keoni

    in reply to: 5.3 #18594
    Keoni
    Participant

    Christy,

    That’s a great question, that I would like the answer to as well! I teach Kindergarten, so I’m wondering what these kinds of assessments might look like in my grade level, if any. But vocabulary spans any grade level for sure!

    -Keoni

    in reply to: 5.2: Skill Development Assessment Practice #18590
    Keoni
    Participant

    Christy,

    For Example C’s VT, I was tempted to grade it as Exemplary because of the note “Tyrell thinks the car that hit the bus was chasing Finn’s mom”, but chose to stay at Proficient because that could be something that was made clear in the story itself rather than being a discovery the student made in their thought process, or even being something they read ‘between the lines’.

    With Example C’s Synopsis, I did grade that as Proficient, because at that level there does not need to be an obvious restating from the VT. I believe a Not Yet is given is only the obvious restating is present. Showing evidence that the restating is not necessary for the student’s understanding is what would grant them Proficient – as this student did show.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Reading Assessment and Feedback #18588
    Keoni
    Participant

    Jenny,

    I appreciate your comment about students learning new skills more efficiently when feedback is given in-the-moment. This is especially critical with our little ones! We’re more likely going to have students retain our feedback and be able to put it into use when we can provide correction and/or encouragement as soon as they’ve made an error or shown great progress. They’re less likely to really remember what they did right or wrong in a lesson, CCS, or assessment after the fact. It’s more beneficial for us as the teacher, as well, to provide immediate feedback, because it allows us to work through what they may be struggling on (or succeeding with) right then and/or make note for ourselves something we may need to work with them on in another CCS or even one-on-one.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: SPECS Experience #18582
    Keoni
    Participant

    Courtney,

    I found myself wondering the same things you did! The process definitely took me longer than I expected and I made a similar point in my own reflection/post that I’m sure students might feel a bit overwhelmed the first few times they experience this CCS preparation. But over time, they would likely become more comfortable with it and be able to complete it quicker. (I’m sure the same would happen with us teachers leading the CCSs as well.)

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Sample Plan Discussion #18560
    Keoni
    Participant

    Courtney,

    I’d like to comment on your statement, “All of these questions could take discussions in multiple directions, which makes this plan flexible for both teachers and students.” So often do we as the teachers think small groups, CCSs, etc. are for the benefit of our students – which of course they are, first and foremost. But I think we forget that there are opportunities for us to have something revealed to us that we might not have considered the first time (or one of many times, after years of discussing the same books). Like Dr. Washburn’s anecdote in this last session/video where his student mentioned that the whole story was based on the horses at the river(?) – I forget the exact detail the student shared. However, it was a great example of how the point of view of our students may shift and expand our own thinking outside of the box of our structured plans and viewpoint.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: CSS- Related Activities #18531
    Keoni
    Participant

    Jenny,

    I definitely “ooh-ed” when I read your comment about how “chunking avoids students who read fast through the book”. Honestly, it hit close to home – in a good way! I was the kid and teenager who LOVED reading. I loved getting swept up in a good story line and connecting to the characters, as well as imagining I was there myself. However, I was not strong with my reading comprehension. I prided myself on being able to breeze through books, reading as quickly as I could. But I remember so often having to reread pages here and there because I’d miss something or wouldn’t understand the point that was being brought across. And that wounded my understanding even more so when it would come to non-fiction texts. I would get a low-level of understanding, not having the patience to really dig deeper into the text and give myself a chance for greater understanding.

    I appreciate how this process (the Application Strand) allows students the independent reading time, but does make them responsible for taking the reading chunks at a time and analyzing each chunk, to eventually build the necessary comprehension.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Collaborative Comprehension #18529
    Keoni
    Participant

    Jenny,

    I thought the Dots & Lines exercise did a great job of illustrating this concept! It’s easy for a teacher to share their own thinking and just hand it all over to their students. But it’s amazing when the teacher becomes another ‘dot’ on the diagram, or even just facilitating a bunch of dots/students in their own discussion through guided questions/prompts about their particular reading. So many cross-connections can be made when you encourage your students to share what’s on their mind – and provide guidance/clarification if need be.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Discussion Board 3.2: Demonstration Observations #18486
    Keoni
    Participant

    Jessie,

    I’ve observed what you have about the time restraint in the classroom, and have lived it myself (not even with just vocabulary introduction). It’s hard when there literally aren’t enough hours in the day to fully and thoroughly hit everything you want to in a lesson. Some days you feel like your lesson went better than expected – you were able to cover everything you planned, the students were really receptive and participating, and you felt like their understanding was so solid. And other days you’re scrounging for the time to just get your main points across, possibly allow a moment for a partner or class discussion, and maybe don’t have a chance to allow the kids a chance to show their understanding outside of the whole group/carpet lesson. It won’t mean you’re any less of a teacher – just that you’re normal and human!

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Vocabulary and Lesson Observations #18484
    Keoni
    Participant

    Jenny,

    To address your last point about dictionaries in class, I experienced both that and the early-on use of a vocabulary graphic organizer. I suppose I saw the later generational use of pulling out dictionaries to find a definition – maybe even then following it up with finding synonyms or antonyms in a thesaurus to help me make clearer meaning of the word. I do also remember being given graphic organizers in school, later towards middle and high school (though dictionaries/internet searches certainly weren’t out of the picture yet), where we would write in a definition, synonyms, use the word in a sentence, and then draw a picture that would describe the word/its meaning. I appreciate how this approach, though more lengthy than traditional means, provides more explicit instruction and a greater depth of understanding through the different opportunities for connections to be made.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Skill Instruction Response #18474
    Keoni
    Participant

    Laura,

    I also find interesting, and appreciate his use of, the first-person language he models with. It’s an easy way to show the students that you as the teacher are taking ownership of what you’re learning and practicing so that students will do the same when it’s their own turn. That is, if that’s actually the goal of the first-person language. I see it being less of a “you’re going to do this” and “you’re going to do that” while the teacher takes a step back, and more of a “let me show you what you’re going to be able to do” (if that makes sense).

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Thinking About Your Thinking #18457
    Keoni
    Participant

    Laura,

    I admit that at first I thought about completing each visual tool on their own, but I totally see the benefit of completing them simultaneously while reading the story! What’s going on in the main character’s development is affected by the events of the story, and vice versa. I can definitely see higher levels of complexity being accessible with this format in intermediate grade levels, as well as finding ways that even primary grade levels can apply a format like this to read-alouds. It’s easier to see how deeper thinking can be engaged when finding the parallels and patterns in a story are guided through this kind of format.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Current Instruction #18442
    Keoni
    Participant

    Laura,

    Do your students keep a type of journal for each book study your class completes? One where they can take ownership of the content put in – including the visual tools they use? Maybe half-size/mini versions of the VTs can be printed and kept in an easily accessible place for the students to grab when it’s time to glue into their journals and fill-in. That way, they’re still using the structures of the various VTs and are still learning when and how to incorporate them in your novel studies, but don’t have to write them out completely each time. Sometimes an interactive notebook helps students see how they can take responsibility for some of their learning in a physical/tangible way – working alongside what their teacher is showing them.

    Just a thought 🙂

    -Keoni

    in reply to: A Traditional Approach #18440
    Keoni
    Participant

    Laura,

    This is a refreshingly concise way of expressing exactly the point I was trying to make in my own post. There was great detail in the story to describe what the character saw, felt, and imagined – but the details started to muddle together just to set the scene. There was no real substance to the passage that would lead the reader to being able to actually infer something about the story, let alone look for any deeper meaning or understanding of the author’s message. The first several lower-level recall questions were definitely close to what I would’ve been given as a student growing up – definitely not substantial enough in purpose to lead to legitimate reading comprehension.

    -Keoni

    in reply to: Discussion Board 2.1: Definition Implications #18377
    Keoni
    Participant

    Dr. Washburn,

    I realize we typically respond to a classmate’s post, but I wanted to highlight the comment you made about how we as Christian school teachers are equipping students to do more than read just to read and learn, but we truly do want them to read God’s Word and to be able to digest it all. There is so much to be learned from Scripture and the infinite ways it applies to our lives. As students are taught about the Bible at our school, at church, and (prayerfully) at home, we want them to be able to make valuable connections between passages in the Bible, find deep understanding in the metaphorical parables and teachings Jesus provided, be able to formulate and ask questions to their teachers, pastors, and parents to help further their thinking and understanding, and ultimately, be able to effectively share the Gospel. What a powerful implication of this definition!

    -Keoni Truesdale

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)