Forums

Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post
    • Discussion Board 1.1: Reading Comprehension & Skill Mastery
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion to read your colleagues’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. “Reading comprehension is a product of thinking applied to text.” What connections between reading comprehension and skill mastery do you see? How does this relate to our pattern: Smooth performance relies on a series of underlying steps? How is reading comprehension like pitching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Protected: Foundations & Frameworks Basic Course Summer 2022
    • 34
    • 85
    • No Topics

      Julia Washburn

    • Discussion Board 1.A
      • This assignment provides the EXperience and establishes the pattern for this portion of the course.Examine the photograph pair. Respond to the prompts that follow.
      • In Photograph A, what items are prominent?
      • In Photograph B, what items are prominent?
      • Why are the photos (the results) different even though their components or building blocks are identical?
      • What does this pair of photos illustrate about the relationship of focus, results, and building blocks? Write your thoughts into a statement, possibly starting this way: A shift in focus produces…
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.B
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your colleagues’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. “The brain has limits on the amount of data it can process. In a constant data stream, the brain will lose most information before it has a chance to process it and construct memory of it. This problem often occurs in schools where students can be subjected to one lecture after another for several periods in a row. The sheer amount of new data presented by a teacher or by teachers can overwhelm the brain’s limits. As a result, the new data cannot be processed in ways that would enable memories or new learning to form. “ What are the implications of this for teaching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Protected: Foundations & Frameworks Basic Course Summer 2022
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.C
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. “Three memory systems play a role in memory formation: sensory memory, working memory, and long-term memory.  Sensory memory enables you to recall what you’ve seen (or heard, felt, tasted, smelled) for a very brief time. If no additional memory systems are activated, sensory memory begins to degrade within 200-500 milliseconds.” What are the implications of this for teaching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.D
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. “For memory to form (and thus, learning to occur), working memory must be activated. Working memory activates when we consciously rehearse, sort, label, and categorize new data and recall relevant previous experience. Working memory, the brain’s systems that maintain ‘information in short-term store for the purpose of executing a task-specific goal,’ is the gateway to long-term storage. In other words, working memory is the gateway to learning.” What are the implications of this for teaching?
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.E
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. “If repeated enough, comprehension can lead to low-level learning. For example, to merely memorize the Gettysburg Address, I would focus on restating the right words in their correct order. I can accomplish this by sequencing Lincoln’s phrases and rehearsing them until I can restate the entire speech. Such material entails merely semantic memory—‘thoughts that require only memorization, but no decision making, logical analysis, or reasoning.’ However, if I want to understand the Gettysburg Address—if I want to grasp the meaning of Lincoln’s words—so I can use it in my future thinking, I must engage memory processes beyond comprehension. To build true understanding you must use ‘perceptual thought.’ That is thinking that overlays the new data with known experience and blends the two to produce meaning. Your working memory must engage in elaboration.” What are the implications of this for teaching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.F
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. “Learning is strengthened when elaboration is intentionally initiated with the learner consciously analyzing the similarities and differences between the new data and the associated long-term memories. By connecting common elements of the new data and long- term memories, the brain constructs understanding. Neurologist and educator Judy Willis explains the critical role elaboration plays in learning: ‘To keep this newly learned material from slipping away, it needs to enter the network of the brain’s wiring. Students can retain the new information by activating their previously learned knowledge that relates to the new material. This prior knowledge exists in stored loops of brain cell connections...Effective teaching uses strategies to help students recognize patterns and then make the connections required to process the new working memories so they can travel into the brain’s long-term storage areas.’” What are the implications of this for teaching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.G
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. How do the core processes of learning relate to the pattern, “a shift in focus produces different results, even when the building blocks are the same”?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.H
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. Which core process is the least represented in your classroom? Why do you think that is the case? What might students miss as a result?
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.I
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. Think of a memorable experience from your own life. Label and sort it—what were its main building blocks and how were they structured? What pattern does that experience illustrate? How have you used that experience (e.g., a basis for offering others advice, a humorous anecdote for entertaining, a “life lesson” you reference for making decisions)?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.J
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. What does the process of transforming knowledge or understanding into utility mean for us as teachers? What are the implications for teaching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 1.K
      Think about the artist consortium. (To review, see page 29 of The Architecture of Learning: Designing Instruction for the Learning Brain.) Now think about the core processes and how focus on each one produces a learning-related transformation. What connections do you recognize? In other words, how are these two concepts related? Prepare an oral explanation of the connections you identify. Video yourself giving that oral explanation and post the video here. Return to this discussion in a few days to watch your classmates’ videos and respond with comments to at least one of them.
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 2.A
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. Why do the FOCUS processes change according to subject matter type? For example, why is AP a necessary focus in skill teaching but not in content teaching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Protected: Foundations & Frameworks Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 2.B
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. How are focus and core processes, and subject matter types like “The Young Person’s guide to the Orchestra: Fugue”? Think: pattern!
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 2.C
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. Here is what research tells us about patterns: —pattern recognition is the key to recall —pattern recognition enables the use of learning in varying contexts (transfer) —patterns foster the development of “prescriptive wisdom” —deepened learning results from movement between details and the patterns they compose What are the implications of this for teaching?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • Discussion Board 3.A
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your colleagues’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. “Here’s a radical idea: We need more assessment, not less. “Seem crazy? Substitute feedback for assessment, and you’ll better understand what I mean. The point of assessment in education is to advance learning, not to merely audit absorption of facts. That’s true whether we’re talking about that fourth-period pop quiz, the school play, or the state test. No one ever mastered a complicated idea or skill the first—or fifth—time. To reach any genuine standard, we need lots of trials, errors, and adjustments based on feedback. “Think of assessment, then, as information for improving” (Grant Wiggins). Does your idea of assessment and how often it should be part of instruction align with these ideas? Explain your initial response to these ideas, and share your opinion. Does considering assessment as “information for improving” differ from your perspective of assessment?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 3.B
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. Review the instructive feedback cycle and the details associated with each element of it. What role do the following have in the effectiveness of instructive feedback: 1) the teacher’s relationship with the student, and 2) the actual words the teacher uses in providing feedback?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • Discussion Board 3.C
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompt. Return to this discussion later to read your colleagues' thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. How does instructive feedback relate to the pattern, The processes need to be connected to produce the desired results?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics

    • DISCUSSION BOARD 3.D
      Read, consider, and respond to the prompts. Return to this discussion in a few days to read your classmates’ thoughts and respond with comments to at least one of them. Examine the following 4th grade summative assessment on division. (The sections that correlate with the critical intersections of a Combination Blueprint are labeled for you.)
      • What, in general, do you notice?
      • What does this assessment suggest about the teaching that took place during the unit?
      • If students were equipped to perform well on this assessment, what does that suggest the impact on their learning might be?
      Associated Courses and Groups:
      Architecture of Learning Basic Course
    • 0
    • 0
    • No Topics